Bring Technology Into Your Subject in Five Ways

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Last year saw a heavy reliance on technology to provide education and continuity to the classroom experience. But, as life gradually returns to normalcy, you might wonder how technology fits into your school structure as schools return to in-person. In short? Schools are getting back to normal but technology isn’t going anywhere. Bringing technology in your subject area doesn’t mean that you need to be an expert in coding or designing websites as a side hustle. Instead, it’s about innovative thinking and putting yourself in your student’s shoes.

A few more questions for you:

How are your students already using technology to understand the world they live in?
How can you, as an educator, provide the context digitally?
What are some strategies to bring more technology into your subject area to engage students?

We’re here to help! We’ve asked our Co-Founder and Chief Technology Officer, Nickey Khemchandani, to share some of his favorite ideas to engage students with technology. Read on to see what he said!

Pick something your students don’t like.

For example, if students are disinterested in writing another five-paragraph essay, turn those essays into a classroom blog! They can share this not just with family/friends but in college portfolios and job applications, students can share. They’re building something that they can represent themselves with using a computer, but they’re also more engaged with homework.

Find an easy win that can be interactive.

Another great way of bringing technology in your subject is with math. Let’s say you’re teaching probability to your students – building a dice game online adds a layer of fun to the lesson while also teaching them critical mathematics and technology skills.

Look for a student who’s already an evangelist with technology.

You do not have to bear the burden of carrying all of the technology weight into your classroom. Usually, your students are already pushing for it. Find an evangelist in your classroom and have them bring technology into their assignments. For example, using technology to build a website instead of writing a paper will inform how to start implementing more tech across your subject.

Talk about social media in your classroom.

Your students are already involved and having conversations about it, so you should too! They’re using platforms like Tik Tok and Instagram, and how they potentially create social media posts around your subject areas will give you insight into their understanding of the subject. One of the best ways to interact with social media is to have them build a campaign, just like you see with Coca-Cola or Netflix, to get them to create a movement around your subject topic.

Build online portfolios

One of the best things a student can do in your subject is to represent your subject with technology. If they start taking pieces of the topic, they learn and add them into a shareable portfolio. So you can have essentially a handbook of all of the issues they’ve engaged with and can now share as notes for future students taking that class or (depending on the topics/skills) they can add to an online portfolio that prepares them for collegiate and professional futures.

about BSD
BSD Education is a global edtech startup focused on designing, developing, and delivering programs of learning for digital skills.
Our work empowers educators to use technology in the classroom by providing an online learning environment, customized curriculum, and professional development. The curricula we create can be implemented immediately with no prior experience and are mapped to US, IB, and British academic standards.

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BSD Education (Build Something Different) partners with schools to bring technology education into K-12 classrooms through our programs of learning, online learning platform and professional development training.

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